How to rent a car without borrowing trouble

If your travel plans include use of a rental car, a little knowledge about auto insurance could preserve your peace of mind and save you money. Before you rent, consult with your insurance agent and check your policy for coverage, limits and deductible amounts. You may be able to save money by declining the insurance offered by the rental company if your own policy provides the coverage you need.

Other than collision

If you are involved in an accident while driving a rental, you could be liable for damage to the auto and any resulting injuries. You could also be responsible for the rental agency’s lost income and the diminished value of the rental car, if damaged. In addition, you may be responsible for losses other than collision, such as fire, theft or vandalism, while the rental is in your possession.

Other drivers

Drivers already named on your personal auto policy may be covered for use of a rental car within the United States. However, if the rental contract limits who can drive the vehicle, be aware of the restrictions and act accordingly. Some personal auto policies are contingent on the language of the rental contract, so you may not be covered if you let someone else drive the vehicle.

And, if you don’t have an auto policy of your own, the rental company’s insurance may be your only option.

Collision

Some personal auto policies cover collision losses to rental cars only if you already have collision coverage on your owned autos, subject to the policy deductible. Other policies offer “first-dollar” coverage on rented vehicles through their liability coverage, meaning you pay no deductible on a covered loss.

Liability

Purchasing an umbrella policy can further protect your interests by increasing your liability coverage. The umbrella also may extend your coverage territory beyond that of your auto policy. However, when traveling abroad, you may need to purchase the insurance offered by the rental company, because foreign countries may not recognize your U.S. policy.

Your personal auto policy may also provide coverage for rental of other types of vehicles: trailers, such as do-it-yourself moving trailers; pickups; vans; and trucks under a specified weight limit.

Advantage Insurance can help you evaluate your coverage needs and make sure there are no gaps in your policy.

As you prepare to travel, take time to assure that the right auto coverage is in place; then relax and enjoy your trip.

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Ride safe with these motorcycle tips

Motorcyclists know that riding gives them a freedom that driving a car just can’t match. But the best riders also know that motorcycles require more focus to operate and don’t provide the same protections cars do in the event of a crash. The best riders also take great care in all situations, whether they’re in heavy traffic on Route 8, stuck in the rain or just taking a quick ride on a perfect day.

If your habits aren’t as safe as they could be, or if you’re new to motorcycling, don’t worry! Instead, take time to improve. The quick safety tips below are a great place to start.

Want more? Check out the Motorcycle Safety Foundation (http://www.msf-usa.org) or the American Motorcyclist Association (www.americanmotorcyclist.com). And remember to give us at Advantage Insurance Agency a call at 330-940-2288 when you need to get coverage for your bike (or your home or auto, boat or more)!

First things first

  • Wear proper safety gear and, most importantly, a helmet – no matter how short your trip may be.
  • Make sure you can be seen by other motorists. Make it easier for them by wearing reflective clothing, always using turn signals (and perhaps hand signals as well) and keeping your headlight on.
  • Even when taking the above precautions, stay alert and assume that other drivers don’t see you — especially at intersections and when making lane changes or passing.
  • Be patient. Don’t tailgate, and if someone is tailgating you, get out of their way.
  • Don’t ride after drinking or taking any medications that could impair your abilities.

Riding at night

  • Again, make sure you’re visible — particularly at dusk. Consider upgrading your headlight or adding other lights to your ride. Is your bike black? What about your clothing? Both will make you more difficult to see at night.
  • Your vision needs to be clear, so keep your visor or goggles clean and free from scratches. If you don’t use face or eye protection, consider it.
  • Carry a flashlight or other emergency gear with you so a mechanical problem doesn’t leave you stranded — and invisible — on the side of a dark road.

Bad weather?

  • Keep rain and cold-weather gear handy. Riding isn’t just more enjoyable when you’re warm and dry — it’s safer, too.
  • Use extreme caution when it first begins to rain, as the roads are most slick at that point. Pull over and wait if necessary. It’s better to be late than ride in unsafe conditions.

We wish that all of your rides could be on sunny days with wide-open roads, but we know that’s not going to happen. So think about safety every time you start up your bike!

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Your 30-step path to financial wellness

In honor of the 30 days of the year that have been dedicated to financial literacy, the experts at Money Management International (MMI) created a 30-step path to financial wellness.

April is the official National Financial Literacy Month; however, regardless of the day or month of the year you begin, the 30-step path will help you to create a successful strategy to better your overall financial position.

Make a commitment to your financial future and take the first step today.

Sleepy Behind the Wheel? Some Cars Can Tell

It’s something that many of us have experienced while driving, though we may not like to admit it.

It’s called a microsleep, a brief state of drowsy unconsciousness that can happen even if your eyes remain open.

Drowsy driving kills. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, drowsy driving caused 824 deaths in 2015, the last year for which figures are available.

Several manufacturers, including Audi, Mercedes and Volvo, currently offer drowsiness detection systems that monitor a vehicle’s movements, such as steering wheel angle, lane deviation, time driven and road conditions. When drowsiness is detected, drivers are typically warned with a sound and the appearance of a coffee cup icon.

But manufacturers and automobile suppliers are now working on advanced technological solutions that go beyond visions of coffee cups.

To find out if drowsiness can be detected even earlier, Plessey Semiconductors has developed sensors, to be placed in a seat, that monitor changes in heart rate.

“We could see this in a vehicle in five years,” said Keith Strickland, chief technology officer of the company, which is based in Plymouth, England.

Bosch, a German supplier of technology to many automotive companies, is developing a camera-based system that will monitor head and eye movements, as well as body posture, heart rate and body temperature.

When such a system is used in vehicles that allow for limited autonomous driving, the vehicle could take over once drowsiness is detected — either coming to an emergency stop or pulling itself off to the side of the road, said Kay Stepper, Bosch’s head of driver assistance and automated driving.

In addition, sensors on the outside of the vehicle will monitor the state of traffic in which the fatigued driver is engaged. Once vehicles can communicate with each other — a capability expected in the next few years — other cars will be able to take appropriate maneuvers to avoid the drowsy driver.

In France, Valeo, another supplier of automotive technology, is developing an infrared camera system that will monitor children in the rear seat as well as the driver’s shoulder, neck and head movements, looking for deviations from the norm.

Checking body temperature and even how the driver is dressed, the system will also be able to customize the interior temperature for each driver, said Guillaume Devauchelle, the company’s innovation director.

Nvidia, chip supplier to Audi, Mercedes, Tesla and others, is developing the Co-Pilot, an artificial-intelligence tool that can learn the behaviors of individual drivers and determine when they are operating outside their norms.

The system will eventually learn a driver’s standard posture, head position, eye-blink rate, facial expression and steering style, among other indexes. Based on a vehicle’s capabilities, the driver will be warned or automatically driven to a safe spot when conditions warrant.

Until vehicles can drive themselves, it will be up to drivers to pull over once they feel drowsy. But drivers tend to make excuses, believing there is no danger because they are just a few minutes from home, or they are not really as tired as they may feel.

“The more tired you are, the less able you are to change your behavior,” such as by pulling off the road for a short rest, said Mikael Ljung Aust, a technical specialist working on drowsiness mitigation technologies at Volvo’s Safety Center in Gothenburg, Sweden.

To encourage drowsy drivers to take a break, Volvo, with a grant from the European Commission, is studying the effects of offering drivers free coffee once erratic steering wheel movements, lane departures and other signs detect that they are falling asleep, using the navigation system to direct them to the nearest coffee stop.

Audi is faced with a unique problem because of its scheduled introduction next year of a car capable of driving up to 35 miles per hour without any driver intervention. When its Traffic Jam Pilot feature is engaged, the vehicle will need to determine if a driver is alert enough to take control after being a passive passenger for long periods.

Through its Driver Availability Detection system, sensors will scan the head and face to ensure that the eyes are open and the driver is alert before the car turns over the steering wheel.

Advanced drowsiness detection systems exist today. For example, Mercedes’s Attention Assist monitors a driver’s behavior for the first 20 minutes behind the wheel to get a baseline of behaviors. Then, the system checks those against as many as 90 indexes, such as steering wheel angle, lane deviation and external factors such as wind gusts and pothole avoidance.

The system can currently detect drowsiness with 80 percent accuracy, said Christoph von Hugo, head of active safety for Mercedes-Benz. If drowsiness is detected, the driver is alerted to the nearest rest stop.

For the past decade Volvo has offered its Driver Alert system. “To detect drowsiness, we study the car, not the driver,” said Mr. Aust of Volvo, looking at differences in the ability of the car to stay in lane, and other factors.

The system detects drowsiness with 97 percent accuracy, Mr. Aust said.

While N.H.T.S.A. reported 824 deaths in 2015 because of drowsiness, that number is likely to be considerably higher, the agency said. Drowsy driving can only be self-reported and not measured like drunkenness. Also, drowsiness is not reported when it is a complication of other factors like excessive drinking.

“We’re a nation of tired drivers. People talk about sleep deprivation as if it’s a badge of honor,” said Deborah Hersman, the head of the National Safety Council and the former chairwoman of the National Transportation Safety Board. “As a society we have to realize that drowsy driving is really dangerous.”

Until fully autonomous vehicles are a reality, “drowsiness is something everyone needs to worry about,” said Mark R. Rosekind, former head of N.H.T.S.A. and an expert on human fatigue. “Our tendency is to say we’re wide-awake when in reality we can fall asleep in a second.”

Still, the obvious solution for a driver who feels fatigued is to pull over and rest. According to Mr. Rosekind, studies with airline pilots show that those who took a nap for 26 minutes improved their performance by 34 percent and alertness by 54 percent, compared with those who did not.

Regardless of how good technology is at detecting drowsiness, fighting off sleep is futile. Because sleep is a biological need, the best solution for drivers is still a low-tech one: Pull over and take a nap.

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Ride sharing may create insurance gaps

Drivers and riders who participate in ride-share alternatives to taxi services may be subject to significant insurance gaps. If you participate in ride-share services as a driver or if you use these increasingly popular services, make sure you have appropriate insurance coverage.

Ride-share programs on the surface sound like a win-win situation: if you need a ride, you can download an app to your mobile device to find and arrange transportation in a driver’s personal vehicle. A simple swipe of your credit card pays the driver. So, instead of hailing a taxi cab — which can sometimes be hard to do — you can quickly get where you need to go and the driver is paid for his or her time and distance traveled.

Ride-share drivers, passengers, other drivers on the road and even pedestrians could all be affected by the insurance protection provided by the network companies that coordinate the ride-share relationship. Some ride-share network companies advertise that they have insurance policies that can protect drivers and their passengers. But there is no standard policy, and without a policy in hand, it becomes difficult to know which specific circumstances trigger coverage or what situations might be excluded.

Additionally, the insurance coverage provided by the ride sharing company may apply only while a passenger is actually in the vehicle. The policy may not provide coverage when the vehicle is on the way to pick up a passenger or after a passenger is dropped off. To complicate matters even further, protection provided by the primary insurer of the driver’s vehicle may exclude coverage while a passenger is in the vehicle or even while the ride-sharing app is turned on or enabled, whether or not a passenger is in the vehicle. This could result in a significant coverage gap for the driver in the event of a loss.

If you or a driver in your family is interested in providing transportation services through a ride-share service, check with your insurance agent first to learn about uninsured liability you may be assuming and what, if any, coverage is provided by your personal auto policy. Personal auto policies were not designed to cover exposures such as ride-sharing, and livery is typically excluded. Ride-share drivers cannot assume that their personal auto insurance will provide protection for anyone injured or any property damaged in an accident, even if they provide transportation-for-hire only on a part-time or incidental basis.

Riders planning to use ride-share services also should consider the risks. If you are injured while using one of these services, will your medical expenses be covered? Would you be compensated for the time lost from work that your injury might cause? Ask to see proof of insurance before using a ride-share service.

The ride-share industry is changing rapidly, and states are gearing up to provide more oversight and regulation. Until they do, consider carefully the risks you take on as a rider or driver.

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11 Spring RV Checks Not to Skip

It’s time to roll your RV out of storage. Here are some maintenance tips to get you ready for the season.

This comprehensive checklist is just what you need to make sure your first spring RV trip is a great one.

The other day an RV owner asked me what I considered to be the most important spring travel checks to prepare an RV for camping season. My response was that there are lots of checks that need to be performed on the RV for a safe and worry free camping season, but some are more important than others.

Here are eleven important checks I wouldn’t leave out:

  1. RV Batteries: Let’s start our spring checks with the battery(s) since it’s possible you removed them for winter storage. The condition of the battery(s) is dependent on how well they were cared for over the winter. Batteries in storage will lose a percentage of current through internal leakage. It’s not uncommon for a battery to discharge up to 10% a month when it is in storage. If you checked and recharged the battery(s) periodically while in storage they should be ready to go. If not, the first step is to fully charge the battery(s). Water should only be added to lead acid battery(s) after fully charging the battery, unless the water level is already below the plates. The plates need to be covered at all times. After the battery is fully charged, check and add distilled water as required. If the battery(s) was removed for storage, reinstall it making absolutely sure it is connected properly. If you don’t feel comfortable performing this work, have it done by a qualified service facility.
  2. RV Water System: After sitting in storage the water system needs to be de-winterized, checked for leaks and sanitized. If your unit was winterized using non-toxic RV antifreeze you need to run fresh water through the entire system until all traces of the antifreeze are removed. Hopefully no antifreeze was added to the fresh water holding tank. If it was, the first step is to drain any remnants from the fresh water tank. Add potable water to the fresh water holding tank, turn the water pump on and open all of the water faucets. When the water is running clear through the system turn the pump off and close the faucets. Take the water heater out of the by-pass mode (if applicable). If the water heater wasn’t bypassed before winterizing the unit, the antifreeze needs to be drained from the water heater tank. Replace any water filter cartridges you removed for storage.
  3. Plumbing: This is a good time to check the plumbing for leaks. With water in the fresh water holding tank turn the 12-volt water pump on and pressurize the water system until the pump shuts off. If the water pump cycles back on, even for a short period of time, there is a leak somewhere. Locate the leak and repair it or take it to an authorized RV service facility to be repaired.
  4. Water Pump: Every spring I like to sanitize the water system. Make sure all of the drains are closed and drain plugs are installed. Take a quarter-cup of household bleach for every fifteen gallons of water your fresh water tank holds. Mix the bleach with water into a one-gallon container and pour the solution into to the fresh water tank fill. Now fill the fresh water holding tank with potable water. Turn the water pump on and run water through all hot and cold faucets until you smell the bleach. Close the faucets and let it sit for twelve hours. Drain all of the water and re-fill the tank with potable water. Turn the water pump on and open all faucets, running the water until you no longer smell any bleach. It may be necessary to repeat this process to eliminate all signs of bleach.
  5. Appliances: If the LP gas cylinders or tank has any LP gas remaining, open the gas supply and check the operation of all LP gas fired appliances. Make sure the water heater tank is full of water before testing the water heater. If an LP gas appliance is not operating properly, have it inspected by an authorized RV service facility. Insects are attracted to the odorant added to LP gas and they build nests that can affect the appliance from operating properly. Note: The LP gas system should have a leak test and LP gas operating pressure test preformed annually. These tests should be performed by an authorized RV repair facility.
  6. LP Gas System: If all the LP gas appliances work properly, plug the unit in and test 120-volt appliances and accessories for proper operation. Note: Make sure you have an adequate electrical source (30-50 amps) depending on your unit, before testing items like the microwave and roof air conditioner(s). After checking the refrigerator in the LP gas mode, turn it off and with the doors open allow sufficient time for it to return to room temperature before checking it in the electric mode.
  7. Tires: Just like a battery looses a percentage of its charge in storage, tires lose a percentage of air pressure. Your RV tires can lose 2-3 psi a month while sitting in storage. This means they could be dangerously low on air pressure. Check the tire pressure in all tires with a quality tire inflation gauge and adjust the inflation pressure to the manufacturer’s recommendation based on the load. Don’t forget the spare! Remember, failing to maintain correct tire pressure, based on the load, can result in fast tread wear, uneven wear, poor handling, and excessive heat build-up which can lead to tire failure. Tire manufacturers publish load and inflation tables that should be followed for proper inflation pressure.
  8. Power Train & Generator: Whether you have a motorhome or a tow vehicle, the power train needs to be checked out. Start by checking all fluid levels. Check the transmission, power steering, engine coolant, engine oil, windshield washer and brake fluid. Consult your vehicle owner’s manual for proper levels. If a fluid level is low, try to determine why and correct the problem. Service the engine and engine fluid levels according to specified intervals found in the vehicle owner’s manual. Start the engine and check for proper readings on all gauges. Check the operation of all lights. Make sure the vehicle emissions / inspection sticker is up to date.
  9. Oil Level: Check the oil level in the generator. Service the generator according to specified intervals found in the owner’s manual. Inspect the generator exhaust system for any damage prior to starting. Never run a generator with a damaged exhaust system. If you didn’t exercise the generator during storage, start and run it for about two hours with at least a half-rated load. Check your generator owner’s manual for load ratings. If you didn’t use a fuel stabilizer and the generator won’t start or continues to surge after starting, have it checked out and repaired by an authorized service facility.
  10. Seams & Sealants: If you didn’t inspect the seams and sealants for potential leaks prior to storage, or if the RV was stored outdoors, this is a good time to do it. I recommend inspecting and resealing seams and sealants at least twice a year and possibly more depending on conditions. Inspect all roof and body seams and around any openings cut into the RV for signs of cracking or damage. Reseal any seams or sealants that show signs of cracking or separation. It’s important you consult your RV owner’s manual or RV dealer for sealants compatible with different types of materials you are attempting to seal. If you don’t feel comfortable performing the inspections or repairing seams and sealants, have the maintenance performed by an authorized service facility. Note: Be extremely careful working on the RV roof. A fall can cause serious injury or death.
  11. Safety Stuff: Re-install any dry-cell batteries or fuses that were removed for storage. If batteries were not removed from safety devices replace them with new batteries now. Test the operation of the carbon monoxide detector, LP gas leak detector and smoke alarm. Inspect all fire extinguishers to make sure they are fully charged. If you have dry powder fire extinguishers, shake and tap them on the bottom to release any settled powder. Review how to properly use a fire extinguisher in the event you need to use it. Make sure everybody understands what the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are and what to do if you are exposed to it.

These are what I would consider to be seven of the most important checks to prep your RV for spring travel. You can add to this list to tailor it to your specific needs, but most importantly, be safe and have a great camping season.

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Flooded? Stay financially afloat

Severe weather patterns in recent years mean homeowners and business owners have experienced everything from record snowfalls and tornadoes to recurring storms with wind, hail and record amounts of rainfall – all leading to a record number of flooded homes and businesses.

Water claims under personal or business insurance contracts can be confusing and easily misunderstood, and standard insurance does not cover everything.

The most common water damage claims result from surface water, sewer backup, ice and snow melt or hydrostatic water pressure (explained in the video below.) Whether you have a personal or business claim, the cause of loss is first determined and then your coverage is reviewed.

Most insurance companies’ standard personal and business policies exclude coverage for surface water that damages the property. You and your agent should be aware of whether or not your insured property is located in a designated flood zone. If so, you can purchase insurance from the National Flood Insurance Program.

The other causes of loss listed can be covered by purchasing endorsements to add coverage beyond what a standard policy includes. These endorsements may limit coverage to a specified dollar amount, but recovering even a portion of the damages could make a big difference to the financial health of your family or business.

Under a personal insurance policy, amendatory endorsements can provide limited coverage for sewer backup, overflow of drains and sumps and hydrostatic water pressure for limited amounts, commensurate with the amount of coverage you purchased on the base policy. Advantage Insurance can help you make the right choices for your individual needs.

Business owners can purchase endorsements to add coverage for exposures such as sewer backup, hydrostatic pressure and interior building damage from rain, sand or dust without damage to the roof or walls. Some endorsements adding coverage for water damage may include coverage for loss of business income and extra expense you incur as a result of a covered loss caused by water damage.

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Phones a huge distraction, and it’s killing us

The advent of the smart phone has brought with it a deluge of texting and other distractive behavior while driving a vehicle. This is no longer confined to the young and restless – we see people of all ages, genders and backgrounds using phones when they should be driving.

SAFETY THREATS

Some startling figures:

These numbers are most likely higher as drivers involved in accidents may be reluctant to admit to driving distracted.

COMMON DISTRACTIONS

While all of the following are common distractions behind the wheel, text messaging is by far the most alarming. It requires significant visual, manual and cognitive focus from the driver – three key things a driver needs to drive safely.

  • Texting
  • Using a cell phone or smartphone
  • Reaching for something
  • Eating and drinking
  • Talking to passengers
  • Grooming
  • Reading, including maps and navigation system
  • Watching a video
  • Adjusting a radio, CD player or other controls in a vehicle
AWARENESS

As important as it is for us to make an effort not to drive distracted, we also need to be aware that others around us – drivers, bicyclists and pedestrians – may be distracted. While you may be able to quickly discern when pedestrians or cyclists are focused on their phones, some behaviors that may tip you off to a distracted driver include:

  • Drifting around in the lane or not staying within lane lines
  • Changing lanes without signaling
  • Braking abruptly
  • Going slower than surrounding traffic
  • Driving faster, then slower again in an erratic pattern
  • Failing to respond to street directional signs and signal lights
  • Following too closely
DROWSINESS

Finally, distracted driving issues can be compounded by fatigue. More and more our daily demands seem to be impinging on our ability to get required sleep. Sleepiness, without fail, results in cognitive and behavioral changes that can contribute to vehicle crashes, poor work performance, accidents and other long-term physical and mental health consequences. Precise counts of crashes caused by drowsy driving are not yet possible.

Be aware of your own distractions, those who are distracted around you and the impact of driving while fatigued.

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Children Act Fast – Poison Prevention For Your Kids

Last night I heard clamoring from our bathroom – not a good sign when you know your one–year–old can pull everything out of the cabinets within 10 seconds. I opened the door about two inches, but found that it quickly became lodged onto the bathroom cabinet. Through the small crack I could see my little girl pulling all of my husband’s toiletries out of the cupboard. By the time I managed to get through the door, she had uncovered almost everything – but that wasn’t my biggest concern. With a bottle of aftershave in one hand, the cap in the other, and a quick sniff of her cologne–filled breath, I realized she decided to have a taste.

Children act fast.

It’s true. When kids are at the age when they want to explore and touch everything in sight (and put things in their mouth like my little one) it’s especially important to take simple precautions that will keep your kids safe from poison.

Keep the following out of sight and out of reach:

  • Medicine, with caps tightly locked
  • Household cleaning products
  • Makeup and toiletries, which can be hazardous
  • Purses, bags and briefcases

And remember the following while considering child safety in your home:

  • Do not mix household products/chemicals. Dangerous gases could be emitted.
  • Child-proof drawers and cabinets within reach of children with safety locks.
  • Install a carbon monoxide alarm and help prevent carbon-monoxide poisoning by keeping your furnace, appliances, fireplaces and stoves in good repair.

Fortunately, my little girl didn’t digest enough aftershave to cause sickness, but it was a wake–up call and did quickly reorganize our toiletries so they’d be out of reach of our kids. If you have kids under the age of five, I’d encourage you to do the same.

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Protecting your identity AND the environment

While we know that it’s important to take steps to protect our personal information, it always seems to end up at the bottom of the to-do list.

But identity theft is not going away any time soon. According to a report from the U.S. Department of Justice, more than 17 million Americans were victims of identity theft in 2014 alone. With numbers like this, chances are good that someone you know has been a victim. And you also know how much of a hassle it can be to deal with the aftermath of identity theft.

What if you could cross several items off your ever growing to-do list all at once? Did you know that many of the actions that help prevent identity theft also have the added benefits of simplifying your busy life and protecting the environment?

3 Environmentally-Friendly Ways to Protect Your Identity
  1. Go Paperless – An easy way for thieves to gain access to your personal information is by stealing your mail. Take advantage of the electronic delivery and online payment services that your banks, utilities, credit card and insurance companies offer. If you already pay online, but still receive paper statements, consider turning them off. Not only do you reduce the risk of identity theft, you reduce the amount of paper cluttering your desk and landfills.
  2. Eliminate Junk Mail – All of those pre-filled credit card offers that seem to arrive each week are another way for criminals to use your personal information to open new credit accounts. You can take steps to reduce the amount of unsolicited mail that you receive. The Federal Trade Commission website has an entire section devoted to privacy and security, including ways to opt out of unsolicited offers and telemarketing calls.
  3. Shred Documents – Believe it or not, criminals routinely sift through the trash of both homeowners and businesses looking for sensitive identity information. One way to prevent this is to shred any documents with personal information after they are no longer needed. While many businesses already shred documents with personal information, homeowners can look for similar services or invest in an inexpensive shredder from the office supply store. In addition to shredding documents, these services also recycle the paper, keeping it from the landfills.

So, set aside a few minutes this weekend to reduce the risk of identity theft. Eliminating paper mail will also help simplify your life and have a positive impact on the environment. Then, you can get back to that book or your favorite show.

Some personal insurance policies offer identity theft protection services. Contact us to find out more information and coverage advice.

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